Chat with Sis Noe . . . How can I produce more semen?

15 Sep, 2019 - 00:09 0 Views
Chat with Sis Noe . . . How can I  produce more semen?

The Sunday News

Hi Sis Noe

WHAT can I do to increase the amount of semen I produce? I have seen videos of men who produce huge amounts of semen. I want to be like that. 

Reply

There is no scientific evidence or clinical research that supports the claim that pills or any other products marketed towards increased semen production work. There is some evidence to suggest that staying hydrated and taking two to three days between ejaculations may result in more volume. However, taking more than three days has not been shown to increase semen volume any further. Keep in mind that an increase in semen production is not an indication of an increase in sperm production or sperm density. It’s easy to compare yourself to what you see on your computer or smartphone screen, but it’s worth noting that pornography in general isn’t an accurate benchmark of sex, including typical semen production. Not only are porn actors recruited due to certain body shapes and the appearance of certain body parts, but they also have the advantage of many takes, flattering lighting, different camera angles (including close-ups that can make ejaculation look like a fountain rather than a squirt), and a team of hair and makeup artistes. All professionally produced porn also has extensive editing, so keep that in mind when you find yourself comparing your body’s real mechanisms to that of any screen-primed porn stars you may enjoy watching. The semen you are producing is enough — it is determined by your body type. 

Hi Sis Noe

I have not had intercourse for over a year, and then recently I had intercourse and experienced vaginal bleeding. What could be the cause of this?

Reply

Rest assured that many have experienced vaginal bleeding associated with penetration or sex. Most vaginal bleeding is considered normal and typically doesn’t require medical treatment. What’s more, not having had sex in over a year could have very well played a part in the bleeding. The good news is that in many cases the bleeding will resolve on its own, depending on the cause. However, bleeding is sometimes indicative of more serious conditions. If you are concerned about vaginal bleeding, believe you have been exposed to an STI, or have other symptoms, an appointment with a health care provider or gynaecologist is a good next step. They will ask you for details about the bleeding, including questions about the colour and flow of blood. They will also likely examine you to determine whether the bleeding is coming from your vagina, cervix, vaginal walls, inner lips, or urethra. This and other information helps your doctor determine or rule out other possible causes, get an appropriate diagnosis, and treatment for you.

Hi Sis Noe

I have had my period for three months non-stop. At times I can go for a month without a period but now it’s been three months. 

Reply

Vaginal bleeding for three continual months is a good indicator that it’s time to see a health care provider. The average length of a menstrual cycle is 28 days, although 21 to 35-day cycles are common. Menstrual blood flow usually lasts for five to seven days. To learn more about why you have had continual bleeding for so long, it is recommended to schedule a visit to a gynaecologist or a nurse practitioner who specialises in women’s health. To find out what is going on, a doctor will most likely focus on your medical history; do a physical exam, including a pelvic exam; order a blood test; and, perform some other diagnostic tests. Menorrhagia is the term used to describe menstrual bleeding characterised by heavy flow and/or prolonged duration. Heavy flow lasting more than seven days but occurring with regular monthly periods may be normal for some people. A doctor can help you consider your symptoms, determine a diagnosis, and discuss a treatment plan that will work for you. Having bleeding for such a long time may be frustrating or concerning; fortunately seeing a doctor can help get you on the track toward an effective treatment and more regular cycles. Take care. 

Hi Sis Noe

I have a girlfriend who is only interested in sex. She does not want us to go out. When I suggest we go somewhere she says we can do everything at my place and we always end up having sex. I want to have more than that. I want a relationship but it seems like this one is only about sex.

Reply

Balancing the needs and expectations of your partner with those of your own may be challenging, but open communication may go a long way in resolving relationship concerns. It sounds like you would like to nurture the relationship and give it time to grow and develop outside the bedroom. Have you spoken with her about what you want in a relationship? If your partner is not interested in developing a relationship outside of the bedroom, you may want to evaluate if the relationship you have now is worth staying in. Are you comfortable staying with your partner for the sex? Would continuing to have sex with this partner keep you from finding someone else with whom you might be more compatible? Can you stay in this relationship for what it’s worth without getting emotionally involved as it might not be reciprocated? These are questions you should ask and answer.

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